February 21, 2012

Song Review: Whirr's "Hide"

AS' first introduction to BUZZSound alumni Whirr's rousing potential was in 2010's Distressor, a 7-song EP that showcased the San Francisco sextet's ability to flawlessly execute a model of shoegaze which includes gigantic, swirling melodies amid a spacious sea of heavenly distortion. Whirr's debut album Pipe Dreams finally arrives March 13th on Tee Pee Records, and among one of the first tracks to trickle its way off the LP is "Hide." As is often made mention in any story regarding Whirr these days, the band features Nick Bassett of Deafheaven, another buzz-worthy Bay Area act whose stature in the metal scene has grown considerably over the past year following their acclaimed debut Roads to Judah. The anecdote should mean very little in this case as putting both of Bassett's projects side by side shows hardly any overlap, barring the fact each share a common affliction for playing music loudly. Here on "Hide" however, the guitarist's metal-minded thought process may have transcended its way onto Whirr's pallette, given the sludgy grounds of distortion it treks as crawling drum beats dig their way deep into the track's tempo. Until now, Whirr has often taken its cues from My Bloody Valentine's anthemic scales and the Cocteau Twins' dreamy soundscape, but "Hide" is -- with the exception of an entrancing male-female vocal front -- beautifully damaged with sunless aggression that shares little common ground with either (and more so to the unlikely matrimony of slo-core and metal fused together by Justin K. Broadrick in Jesu.) Today's modern-day shoegazers tend to wear their influences on their sleeve all too well. On "Hide," it replenishes AS faith in them as Whirr uses the ace up theirs to bend and mold the shoegaze model into a much darker light.

Whirr - "Hide"

2 comments:

  1. copies of Distressor are still available at http://www.bridgetownrecords.info

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  2. ...and I highly recommended everyone to pick one up. The cassette release from Bridgetown is how I discovered Whir (then known as Whirl.)

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